Arctic Alaska Travel Guide
 
Fairbanks Alaska: Fairbanks is Alaska's second largest city with a city population of about 32,000, and a local area population of about 80,000. Fairbanks Alaska is ideally situated in the Tanana Valley with the Alaska Range and Mt. McKinley to the south, and Alaska's vast arctic region to the north. Due to it's northern latitude, Fairbanks experiences lengthy summer days produce average temperatures in the 60's and a wide variety of local flora. Fairbanks is the gateway to Alaska's arctic, the north slope oil fields, the villages, and the northern mining operations.

Nome Alaska: Nome Alaska, with a population of about 4,000, is located on the southern coast of the Seward Pennisula in the western Alaska arctic region. Visitors to Nome enjoy a variety of activities, cultural experiences, and events. Wildlife viewing, gold rush history, Native Alaskan culture, fishing, and winter events such as the world famous Iditarod sled dog race are all part of a visit to Nome in Alaska's arctic.

Kotzebue Alaska: The City, or Native Village, of Kotzebue is located 33 miles North of the Arctic Circle on Alaska's Western coast.The city has a population of 3,600. As Alaska's largest arctic native village, Kotzebue is rich in the culture and traditions of the Alaska native peoples. Learn about the traditional ways including the arts, legends, foods and ways of Kotzebue's arctic inhabitants.

Barrow Alaska: Barrow is the northernmost settlement in the United States, located on the edge of the polar ice more than 300 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Vast seas of ice extend from Point Barrow another 1200 miles to the North Pole. From May to August, Barrow basks in the glow of the midnight sun, while in the months of October through February the sun doesn't rise at all. Experience the remarkable culture, and suprisingly active lifestyle of the inhabitants of this northernmost Alaskan arctic city.

Prudhoe Bay Alaska: Prudhoe Bay (aka Deadhorse) Alaska is home to the largest oil field in North America. It is located in arctic Alaska between the coast of the Beaufort Sea and the North Slope of the Brooks Range. It is about 1200 mi. south of the North Pole and 250 mi. north of the Artic Circle. Widespread Prudhoe Bay is connected by ice roads built during winter months for access to remote drill sites.

The Dalton Highway: Alaska's Dalton Highway travels through some of the most remote and spectacular land in Alaska. Paralleling the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System from Livengood the Highway crosses the Yukon River, Arctic Circle, and Brooks Mountain Range on its way to Prudhoe Bay and the Arctic Ocean. Most of the land is undeveloped and contains an abundance of unique scenery, diverse wildlife, and outdoor opportunities. Along the way you will pass near the Yukon Flats, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuges, and Gates of the Arctic National Park.

The Arctic Circle: The Arctic Circle is the invisible circle of latitude on the earth's surface at 66°33' north, marking the southern limit of the area where the sun does not rise on the winter solstice or set on the summer solstice. It is approximately 1,650 miles from the North Pole. The Arctic Circle is also the outermost parallel circle as measured from the North Pole where the sun cannot be seen above the horizon during the winter solstice on December 21st. Continuous day or night ranges from one day at the Arctic Circle to six months at the North Pole. The Arctic Circle is also the name given the geographic arctic region around the North Pole. It includes the Arctic Ocean and the northern parts of three continents. A region rich in natural resources and spectacular beauty, the Arctic Circle region is one of the last frontiers on the planet.

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is located in the state’s remote northeast corner. ANWR is a vast expanse of marshy tundra, divided by interwoven rivers, situated between the Brooks Range to the south, and the icy Beaufort Sea to the north. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) consists of 19 million acres. Eight million acres of that are wilderness never to be disturbed. Another 9.5 million acres are under wildlife refuge designation allowing no development. The remaining 1.5 million acres potentially hold as much as 16 billion barrels of oil.

 
Gateway to Alaska's Arctic
Fairbanks, Alaska
Fairbanks AlaskaFairbanks is Alaska's second largest city with a city population of about 32,000, and a local area population of about 80,000. Fairbanks Alaska is ideally situated in the Tanana Valley with the Alaska Range and Mt. McKinley to the south, and Alaska's vast arctic region to the north. Due to it's northern latitude, Fairbanks experiences lengthy summer days produce average temperatures in the 60's and a wide variety of local flora. Fairbanks is the gateway to Alaska's arctic, the north slope oil fields, the villages, and the northern mining operations.

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